Horticulture

Scotland is renowned for the quality of its private and public horticultural collections, and its rich cultural history of plant collecting, allotments and gardening. Horticultural plantings are of significant economic value, as well as providing amenity, health and well-being, cultural and conservation resources. However, pest and pathogens represent a major threat to this highly diverse set of plantings.

Horticultural plantings provide amenity value in public spaces, form structural components of landscaping projects, represent a significant component of urban biodiversity and are central to private, public and heritage gardens. Given the diversity of plants involved in horticulture, there is a corresponding diversity of pests and pathogens of concern, and a particular challenge is the extensive network of plant movement at a range of scales from industrial supply to movement of individual plants between gardens. This results in a highly distributed network of pest and disease vectors. The role of the public is of particular importance for horticulture, in terms of both the ownership of plants in private gardens, and as being a major source of plant movement.